New Zealand Economy

The economy in New Zealand has performed quite well in recent years, however there are a few bottlenecks especially in housing and urban infrastructure, inequalities in living standards, and rising environmental pressures are all challenges to achieving sustainable and inclusive growth.

Steve Collie: “A study from Roy Morgan Research sheds more light on the subject of the growth of the economy – and its importance within the country”. Without a solid stance on making lasting economic changes aimed at improvement, those in the running for the September elections won’t have a leg to stand on. As it stands, economic issues are the biggest concern for the country’s residents.

According to the report, “When asked about the most important problem facing New Zealand, 42% of New Zealanders mention some kind of Economic issue. This is down 3% since October 2013 but still well ahead of Social issues (21%, up 1%), Government/ Public policy/ Human rights issues (19%, unchanged) and Environmental issues (9%, up 3%).”

New Zealand EconomyRoy Morgan CEO Michele Levine said that continued data aggregation places issues with the economy on the top for both New Zealand and the world at-large. “One of the concerns also sheds light on a problem affecting the whole world: imbalance of wealth”, according to professionals like Roy Morgan and Steve Collie.

As Morgan stated about the issue, “Over the last few surveys the problems within the economy have taken a different shape – or at least are being articulated differently. Since July 2013 more New Zealanders are concerned with the ‘imbalance of wealth’ / ‘the gap between the rich and the poor’ than are concerned about the more ‘economic’ metrics like recession, inflation, exchange rates and the value of the dollar.”

The importance of these issues comes right alongside the viewpoints expressed by current New Zealand Prime Minister John Key. Many analysts believe that this alignment will likely lead to his reelection in September. “However, other candidates could easily overtake Key if this emphasis is lost in the coming months” Steve Collie says.

Tourism and Growth in New Zealand

One big example of investing in the country comes through a $1.92 million investment in the tourism industry. A report from Creative NZ, the arts council of New Zealand, the investment comes as a way to encourage more touring throughout the country – a big draw for both locals and travelers visiting the nation which will also benefit the locals economy.

As Creative New Zealand Senior Manager Cath Cardiff described, the investment reflects an important area of the country’s tourism – and one that was directly in need of something more. “An effective way to develop and manage touring of medium scale work has long been identified as a missing link in our arts infrastructure,” Cardiff said. “The agency and fund will be a catalyst for ensuring more audiences enjoy great New Zealand performing art experiences.”

Steve Collie and Cath Cardiff: “This arts-based initiative showcases the country’s willingness to invest money where it’s needed for improvement”. Investing in programs and changes within the arts will also likely drive tourism and recreation within the country. As Cardiff continued, “In our small country touring is essential for maintaining and increasing audiences for our arts companies and for sustaining the life of a new work beyond its first season.”

Growth is coming in practically every industry within the country of New Zealand. As marketing professional Steve Collie recently described, many of the country’s investments in tourism and beyond are already showing benefits within other industries.

New Zealand EconomyIn Steve Collie’s words, “I work in online marketing, but that doesn’t mean I can’t see effort to grow the economy in other fields when I see it. I think that initiatives like the government’s recent $2 million commitment to driving tourism show that the current administration is doing its part to address the economic concerns of the electorate.”

Business professionals see government initiatives like this as a positive sign of growth and commitment. And this type of positive energy feeds into an overall improvement in how residents and business owners approach their country’s pride and that includes the economy.

“It’s hallmarks like these that show a government on the right track,” Steve Collie continued.

Without a streamlined focus on the economic issues facing New Zealand, those in the running face alienating themselves from residents. The economy needs to remain a top concern – and this includes making lasting changes for improvements. While business professionals like Steve Collie reflect on the current improvements of the economy, they also look forward to bigger and better things in years to come.

 

The New Zealand vs. Australia tide has now fully turned.

New Zealand Business - The HeraldStephen Collie: “Besides from practically claiming the Bledisloe Cup as its very own, New Zealand can present a healthier economic climate than Australia, a financial budget surplus for the current year and a decreased unemployment level. And today the land of the long white cloud desires Aussie laborers”.

A number of New Zealand job expos have been hosted throughout Australia to attempt to entice many of the 500,000 Kiwi expats located in Australia back home as well as any Australians who would like employment to fill up an anticipated 50,000 job vacancies throughout the next two years.

“Unemployment is going down and we’re beginning to see skills shortages,”the New Zealand Employment Minister told ABC radio recently. New Zealand organizations and businesses seeking 2500 trades-people spanning a range of sectors – IT and design, engineering, construction and manufacturing. The Minister also said somewhere between 1600 and 1700 people came at a 2 day job expo in Perth recently. “About 60 per cent were being New Zealanders considering going home and the the rest were Aussies or folks who had recently relocated to Australia”, says Stephen Collie.

“It’s an instance of focusing on both expat Kiwis to come back … and Australians as well,” the Minister said. And many folks seem to be addressing the call. October was the best month since late 1993 in which there was net migration into New Zealand from Australia. “We anticipate that to go on. That’s really since the New Zealand economy continues to be getting steadily stronger,” the Minister said.

While Australia was in much better shape soon after the worldwide financial crisis, it had been a lot harder in New Zealand, complicated by the Canterbury earthquakes. “As a consequence of that our businesses have in all probability strengthened by themselves and got their selves more match fit,” he said. Blossoming exports have already been part of New Zealand’s triumph story, fueled by its 2008 free trade deal with China which has been a benefit for its dairy sector. The Minister isn’t worried that Australia has recently signed its own FTA with China, saying it really is welcome because there had been a limit to what New Zealand could do by itself.

The jobs fair moves on to Melbourne and Brisbane early in 2015. “Locals are invited to visit the expo and find out about job opportunities”, says Stephen Collie, NZ based entrepreneur and business owner and operator.

 

 

New Zealand Enterprises

Subsequent to several years of shortfall, the government of New Zealand had a lot of great news to present in 2014. The national budget for 2015 included a surplus, expected at that moment of $372 million. This good news got better yet, notes entrepreneur Stephen Collie, given that the surplus is predicted to improve from year to year throughout the next couple of years. By 2017-18, the nation’s surplus is anticipated to boost to $3.5 billion.

The government’s surplus will have a significant effect on numerous sectors of industries in the country. It is most likely to enhance the day-to-day lives of New Zealand residents and greatly improve business potential in the nation. The surplus won’t eliminate liabilities entirely. Instead, the aim is to lower the nation’s debt to 20 % of GDP by 2020. At present, national debt is 26 percent of gross domestic product.


Steve Karl Collie Highlights The New Zealand… by indypostednews

Governing the Housing Sector

An outstanding area of substantial boost in New Zealand has been the building. sector. The leading home builder in the country reports that it has built nearly 50 percent more homes this present year than last, and that a year ago already saw a major increase in the quantity of dwellings built. The building boom in the country has been powered to some extent by reconstructing efforts in Christchurch following the 2011 earthquake. But it’s also being driven by an inflow of immigrants as well as others trying to find accommodation in areas including Auckland.

New Zealand BusinessThe construction growth, together with the predicted surplus, may be great news for New Zealanders and entrepreneurs, says Stephen Collie. When there is not enough homes, the price tag on a house will increase far beyond the reach of the everyday blue-collar worker. Increasing the amount of houses on the market reduces the risk of a housing bubble from developing. Mr.English, the Finance Minister for New Zealand, emphasized the country’s commitment to keeping the price of building materials low and ensuring that there is enough land on which to build in order to avoid a bubble. A housing bubble could possibly be just one of the worst things for the country’s recovery, as reported by the Wall Street Journal.

The Surplus Paves the Way for Certain Industries

The government’s budget surplus is performing wonders for the New Zealand dollar, that has elevated in value by in excess of 3 percent in the last year. However that increase in the value of currency can put a number of sectors vulnerable. By way of example, the tourism industry has a tendency to diminish when currency values rise, as visitors are less likely to vacation at areas in which their own country’s money is worth significantly less.

New Zealand Trade & Enterprise