New Zealand Local Business

Small enterprise is without a doubt positively playing a major part in the economic health and stability of New Zealand, says long time entrepreneur and businessman Stephen Collie, the coordinator of Collie Shipping, who operates a number of dredging barges. You see, the government’s latest decision to carry out an assessment of coastal navigation safeness must be music to the ears for many associated with the manufacturing and shipping industry. The report demonstrates that the nation is devoted to delivering individuals with a safe natural environment and to broadening prospects for local companies and business.

Stephen Collie, “Considering how crucial the production sector is for the country’s economic system and just how much of that industry involves the shoreline, whether it is oil drilling or dredging, the review is much more than merely an approach to ensure safety; it becomes an investment in developing the country’s finances.”

Commercial Enterprise in NZ

Small business is in fact relatively big in New Zealand, as reported by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. A large number of companies (97%) have less than 20 staff members. Almost 70 percent of those enterprises do not have staff at all. Throughout several sectors, a surprising greater part of businesses have 19 or fewer personnel. As an example, close to 19,000 businesses in the production sector employ just around 19 people. More than just 48,500 building companies also have less than 20 staff members.

Small enterprise is not just common in New Zealand. You’ll find it adds a significant amount to the country’s Gross Domestic Product as well as many job opportunities for individuals. Companies that employ up to 19 folks contribute close to 30 percent of the country’s GDP, or more than $56 million. Smaller sized businesses also created more than 40 percent of new job opportunities in the country in 2012.

Local Business

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The Safety Review

The effect most typically associated with local business on New Zealand can be clearly seen in the increase of activity on the seaside. According to Maritime New Zealand, the volume of port call, voyages and ships happen to be continuously growing year after year since 2009-2010. In 2012-2013, 869 vessels created in excess of 2,300 voyages and over 5,600 port calls.

The recently released safety review was created to detect risks and assess the existing safety precautions in place, along with potential safety measures, notes Stephen Collie. The review is planned this month and the initial round should certainly last for about Twelve months.

According to the director of Maritime New Zealand, the review is just one part of a whole new focus on building a risk-focused and intelligence-led strategy to safety for all individuals and business. The director emphasized the importance of having a up-to-date and precise picture of what the potential risks are. Also, he mentioned changing technology as an aspect to consider behind the review.

Stephen Collie: “Vessels aren’t only becoming numerous, they’re also ever-increasing in size as well as becoming more technologically advanced. Most vessels currently have sophisticated navigational aids not seen in decades prior”.

Despite the fact that the director emphasizes that the safety review isn’t happening as a consequence a of single incident, past happenings, for example the grounding of the Rena in 2011 and the grounding of Lake Triview this past spring, could have some influence on the review.

The Rena event is often recognized as the worst ecological disaster in the country’s historical past. 3 years after the incident, the hulk of the ship remains to be trapped in the reef. The owner of the Lake Triview, along with crew members and managers will need to show up before the courts, as the ship harmed the reef when it went aground. Crew members also decided not to tell Maritime New Zealand of the grounding, for which they are being penalized.

As soon as completed, the safety review should ideally produce new solutions for workers, local companies and business, making coastal activity more effective and safe for all those involved. “The outcome of the review are anticipated to have a positive effect on the manufacturing industry as well as its workforce”, Stephen Collie says.


References:

Maritime New Zealand

Maritime New Zealand is a great place to work, and its staff are great people to work with. In head office and around the regions, at the front line and behind the scenes, MNZ staff work hard to ensure safe, secure and clean seas and waterways for New Zealand….Learn More

Maritime New Zealand – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A maritime authority called the Marine Board was originally established in 1862 and controlled by the Customs Department until near the end of the nineteenth century, when it was renamed the Marine Department….Learn More

 

The New Zealand vs. Australia tide has now fully turned.

Stephen Collie: “Besides from practically claiming the Bledisloe Cup as its very own, New Zealand can present a healthier economic climate than Australia, a financial budget surplus for the current year and a decreased unemployment level. And today the land of the long white cloud desires Aussie laborers”.

A number of New Zealand job expos have been hosted throughout Australia to attempt to entice many of the 500,000 Kiwi expats located in Australia back home as well as any Australians who would like employment to fill up an anticipated 50,000 job vacancies throughout the next two years.

“Unemployment is going down and we’re beginning to see skills shortages,”the New Zealand Employment Minister told ABC radio recently. New Zealand organizations and businesses seeking 2500 trades-people spanning a range of sectors – IT and design, engineering, construction and manufacturing. The Minister also said somewhere between 1600 and 1700 people came at a 2 day job expo in Perth recently. “About 60 per cent were being New Zealanders considering going home and the the rest were Aussies or folks who had recently relocated to Australia”, says Stephen Collie.

New Zealand needs Australian workers.

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“It’s an instance of focusing on both expat Kiwis to come back … and Australians as well,” the Minister said. And many folks seem to be addressing the call. October was the best month since late 1993 in which there was net migration into New Zealand from Australia. “We anticipate that to go on. That’s really since the New Zealand economy continues to be getting steadily stronger,” the Minister said.

While Australia was in much better shape soon after the worldwide financial crisis, it had been a lot harder in New Zealand, complicated by the Canterbury earthquakes. “As a consequence of that our businesses have in all probability strengthened by themselves and got their selves more match fit,” he said. Blossoming exports have already been part of New Zealand’s triumph story, fueled by its 2008 free trade deal with China which has been a benefit for its dairy sector. The Minister isn’t worried that Australia has recently signed its own FTA with China, saying it really is welcome because there had been a limit to what New Zealand could do by itself.

The jobs fair moves on to Melbourne and Brisbane early in 2015. “Locals are invited to visit the expo and find out about job opportunities”, says Stephen Collie, NZ based entrepreneur and business owner.


Featured Image Courtesy of Newshub.co.nz

 

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